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Kemmelberg

Photo Focus: Celtic Drinking Equipment

by J L Putman & M Soenen

 

Potsherds of imported black varnished Attic
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

On the Kemmelberg, small fragments of materials that fit in with the culture of drinking rituals have been found: a miniscule shard of imported Attic pottery, fragments of an imitation pitcher with spout, and of an imitation drinking bowl and a piece of drinking horn fitting made of decorated gold leaf.

Potsherds of imported black varnished Attic (GR) earthenware
The black varnished Attic sherd found is only 2.0cm x 1.2cm in size and may have come from a drinking bowl or crater.

Fragment of earthen pouring spout
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

Fragment of earthen pouring spout
This fragment of an earthen pouring spout appears to be a fragment of an imitation of a pouring spout from a bronze pitcher from the grand grave of the 'Princess' of Reinheim (DE).

Fragment of an earthen pitcher handle
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

Fragment of an earthen pitcher handle
The fragment of the handle of a pitcher also appears to be a fragment of an imitation of a bronze pitcher from the 'Princess' of Reinheim (DE).

Fragment of earthen handle
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

Fragment of earthen handle
This fragment is very reminiscent of the handle of an earthen imitation of a kylix.

Greek kylix
Photo © MAN Madrid

Greek kylix
A Greek kylix is an earthen bowl with handles from which the ancient Greeks drank wine.

Golden drinking horn fitting
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO, & J L Putman

Golden drinking horn fitting
A piece of gold leaf (1.6cm x 1.4cm) belongs to a drinking horn fitting and resembles finds from 'prince graves' in the Rhine area, such as the grave of the 'princess' of Reinheim (DE). Unfortunately, the piece is very creased. The dark shade is helping to localise a punched decoration.

Fragment of gold leaf, recorded with MiniDome
Photo © H Hameeuw, RAMS

Fragment of gold leaf, recorded with MiniDome
This image (front and back) shows more details of the decoration which consists of pearl rims at the top and bottom, with a series of drops or eyelets in between which serve as the basis for tongue-shaped, stylised palm fronds.

Cup on hollow base
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

Cup on hollow base
This cup may also be a (ritual) drinking cup, unfortunately (ritually?) burned or misfired. It has the content of two glasses of Belgian Trappist beer (approximately 66cl).

Kemmelware misfire
Photo © L Verhetsel, VISO

Kemmelware misfire
The rituals surrounding production - including misfires - and lending or exporting these large pots may have been related to their use as mixing vessels, or to other actions during gatherings involving food and drinks.

 

 

Text copyright © Archeo Kemmelberg. An original feature for the History Files: Kemmelberg.